Content Marketing for Law Firms: More, More, More

Blogging has moved from top billing in social media marketing to an ensemble role. A blog is still an important player in the markting ecosystem, but it now shares the stage with other major and minor players in a much bigger, more robust production called content marketing.

The following BlueGlass Interactive infographic illustrates the variety and range of content types and distribution models. BlueGlass executive Chris Winfield notes, “Instead of just investing in their blog and blogging strategies, [companies are] investing in content people will actually want to share. Even if it’s not directly related to selling something, it’s still branding.”

The top 20 content marketing tactics according to a recent Content Marketing Institute survey:

  1. Articles
  2. Social media
  3. Blogs
  4. eNewsletters
  5. Case studies
  6. In-person events
  7. Videos
  8. White papers
  9. Webinars/webcasts
  10. Microsites
  11. Print magazines
  12. Traditional media
  13. Research reports
  14. Branded content tools
  15. Print newsletter
  16. eBooks
  17. Podcasts
  18. Mobile content
  19. Digital magazines
  20. Virtual conferences
WARNING: This does not mean use ALL of these tactics. Rather, it suggests that your marketing program can benefit from thinking beyond the usual suspects: blog, LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. Greater depth, breadth, variety, ubiquity and frequency of content will generate more opportunities to be discovered.

 

Law Firm Websites Need to Master Inbound Marketing Basics

If the primary objective of your next website is to “inspire and present the right firm image,” then don’t be surprised if it doesn’t perform much better than your former site.

While law firm websites are getting more visually interesting, they will not generate more inquiries that lead to new business until the primary focus is on helping clients easily find the information they are looking for.

Think Like a Potential Client

Before you get carried away with the aesthetic sweep of your website, heed the guidance of “Chicago School” of architecture progenitor Louis Sullivan — “Form ever follows function.” As Jessica Meher notes, that dictum starts with your site’s homepage. “A homepage needs to wear many hats and serve many audiences who come from many different places….In order for a homepage to work, it needs to meet its purpose and contain key elements that attract traffic, educate your visitors, and convert browsers into buyers.”

The following HubSpot annotation illustrates how to build a functional framework for a law firm website homepage. Once you build this, you can overlay it with “strong, compelling, and emotional images” that animate your brand.