My State Bar of Texas Annual Meeting Wrap-Up

Last week I had the great good fortune to participate in the State Bar of Texas Annual Meeting, and live blogged on Twitter — hashtag #sbot11 — a goodly amount of interesting comments and insights from the sessions I attended . It was topically diverse, engaging, well-curated and well-run, with a lot of strong, actionable content.

Since my interest is marketing and business development, I spent my day Thursday in a series of sessions called “The Adaptable Lawyer Legal Innovation/Computer and Technology Track,” and Friday in the Law Practice Management track. While it wasn’t billed or consciously framed as such, the content of those sessions aligned with one or more of four basic subject areas:

  • Mobile computing
  • Social media platforms
  • Content marketing
  • Niche marketing

Mobile Computing

The standing-room-only crowd for the “60 Apps in 60 Minutes” session made it clear. From iPads and productivity apps to cloud-based research tools and practice management systems, mobile computing is transforming the way that lawyers work. While the iPad was still something of a novelty for “geeks” at last year’s annual meeting, it has quickly evolved into an essential operational hub. As Tom Mighell pointed out in his fast-paced and useful presentation, the depth and breadth of applications specifically for lawyers has made the iPad the de facto mobile computing platform for lawyers.

Social Media Platforms

Facebook was clearly the shiny object this year, with Twitter and LinkedIn tied for a distant second. Last year’s belle of the ball — blogging — was hardly discussed. That probably sounds snarky, but it derives from disappointment about missed opportunities. The presenters who discussed the various social platforms could have framed them in an integrated context, drilling down further into one or more and offering actionable guidance and specific counsel about how use cases can differ by social platform, firm size and practice area. Instead, the overall impression was “here are all the social media sites you need to join.”

Content Marketing

As mentioned above, legal marketing tends to focus on the channel rather than the product. In other words, the social media platforms themselves rather than a merchandising strategy for content. While no one discussed content marketing directly, several presenters showed an inchoate sense of the “create once, publish everywhere” axiom of social media marketing. A simple example of this would be to write a blog post, tease it on you Twitter and LinkedIn feeds, cross-post it on LinkedIn groups and link to it on Facebook.

I was excited to hear several speakers mention JD Supra, an online content distribution service for legal topics (articles, white papers, presentations) that is woefully underutilized and deserves serious consideration as an organic search/social signal amplifier.

As a practical matter, law firms are likelier to see quicker, more direct results from JD Supra as a content marketing platform than from Facebook — and with  a lot less effort.

Niche Marketing

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, there were several good niche marketing case studies, but you had to really dig for them under generic social media palaver. For example, instead of discussing how focusing on a niche expertise — the Foreign and Corrupt Practices Act — led to a thriving international business practice, one panelist spent his time extolling his narrow and idiosyncratic understanding and use of social media.

Since the number of solo and small firms chasing after a declining pool of general business and family law opportunities is increasing, next year’s program would benefit from a session with practical instruction on how to leverage specific interests and expertise into unique value propositions that attract clients.

Summary

I’ll give the last word to Kevin O’Keefe, who tweeted, “Is there a better State Bar Annual Meeting than Texas? Great people, presenters, and connections.”

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